Category: Books

Book: The New Age Of Innovation

“The New Age of Innovation reveals that the key to creating value and the future growth of every business depends on accessing a global network of resources to co-create unique experiences with customers, one at a time. To achieve this, CEOs, executives, and managers at every level must transform their business processes, technical systems, and supply chain management, implementing key social and technological infrastructure requirements to create an ongoing innovation advantage.

In this landmark work, Prahalad and Krishnan explain how to accomplish this shift–one where IT and the management architecture form the corporation’s fundamental foundation. This book provides strategies for

  • Redesigning systems to co-create value with customers and connect all parts of a firm to this process
  • Measuring individual behavior through smart analytics
  • Ceaselessly improving the flexibility and efficiency in all customer-facing and back-end processes
  • Treating all involved individuals–customers, employees, investors, suppliers–as unique
  • Working across cultures and time-zones in a seamless global network
  • Building teams that are capable of providing high-quality, low-cost solutions rapidly

To successfully compete on the battlefields of 21st-century business, companies must reinvent their processes and culture in order to sustain innovative solutions. The New Age of Innovation is a complete program for achieving this transformation to meet the needs of the end consumer of the future.”  >> Amazon.com

Book Brought Up At A Conference: Plugged In

“Although Erickson admits that her own Generation Y son informed her that he would prefer to consult a blog for career advice rather than dead-tree technology, her effort—chock-full of demographic data and a portrait of the generation’s collective aspirations—is certainly worthy of the effort required of literally turning pages. An author and researcher in demographics and organizational behavior, Erickson has the ability to customize career strategies for this newest generation entering the workforce in a way designed to be immediately useful. The author’s thoroughness in translating generic advice—such as the importance of developing good communications skills—into Gen Y–speak makes the book informative and appealingly fresh. Despite gearing her message to younger workers, Erickson’s effort speaks to a much broader audience: her examination of what influences and motivates this emerging generation would be of interest to potential employers and marketers.”  Source: www.amazon.com

Dr. Seus: Oh, the Places You’ll Go!

Wondering where to go and what to do in life?  I’ve certainly been there, life is full of strife.  Don’t worry too much although yes even I often do.  Consult in Dr. Suess and you may find what you are looking for deep within you.  Hope this helps those looking for answers, we hate seeing you so blue.  Read on and know we all hope your biggest wishes come true.

“Congratulations!
Today is your day.
You’re off to Great Places!
You’re off and away!

You have brains in your head.
You have feet in your shoes.
You can steer yourself any direction you choose.
You’re on your own. And you know what you know. And YOU are the guy who’ll decide where to go.

(more…)

Book: Predictably Irrational

Kevin Rose recommended this book on this week’s Diggnation which sounds interesting. You can buy it on Amazon here.  Amazon’s description is: “Irrational behavior is a part of human nature, but as MIT professor Ariely has discovered in 20 years of researching behavioral economics, people tend to behave irrationally in a predictable fashion. Drawing on psychology and economics, behavioral economics can show us why cautious people make poor decisions about sex when aroused, why patients get greater relief from a more expensive drug over its cheaper counterpart and why honest people may steal office supplies or communal food, but not money.

According to Ariely, our understanding of economics, now based on the assumption of a rational subject, should, in fact, be based on our systematic, unsurprising irrationality. Ariely argues that greater understanding of previously ignored or misunderstood forces (emotions, relativity and social norms) that influence our economic behavior brings a variety of opportunities for reexamining individual motivation and consumer choice, as well as economic and educational policy. Ariely’s intelligent, exuberant style and thought-provoking arguments make for a fascinating, eye-opening read.”

Check Out Zuda.com

Check out zuda.com, it lets you read comics online submitted by the public.  The only drawback I can find so far is I don’t know how to read the whole comic (maybe you can’t but it doesn’t tell me that).  If anyone can figure that out let me know.  Also, check out this comic.