Category: Books

Book: Orbit – Inspiring Stories of Ordinary People Who Led Extraordinary Lives…

This book looks like it would be a good read, here is the description from Amazon…

Review
“You probably won’t have heard of any of the people eulogized in Obit, but they will remind you of the variety of humans on earth and the absolute certainty that no matter how powerful a personality, eventually the body goes, and that what remains stays not only in people’s hearts, but in their stories.”
Chicago Sun-Times

Product Description
Like Everything I Really Needed to Know, I Learned in Kindergarten, or Tuesdays with Morrie, Obit is a wise and deeply moving book that illuminates the human condition. For ten years, Jim Sheeler has scoured Colorado looking for subjects whose stories he will tell for the last time. Most are unknowns, but that doesn’t mean they’re nobodies. Their obituaries are sometimes humorous, sometimes heartbreaking, and chock full of life lessons as taught by the people we all pass on the street every day. And thanks to Sheeler’s brilliant and compassionate prose, it’s not too late to meet them.

A Book I Want to Read – Blink…

Here is the description of the book on Amazon.com:

Blink is about the first two seconds of looking–the decisive glance that knows in an instant. Gladwell, the best-selling author of The Tipping Point, campaigns for snap judgments and mind reading with a gift for translating research into splendid storytelling. Building his case with scenes from a marriage, heart attack triage, speed dating, choking on the golf course, selling cars, and military maneuvers, he persuades readers to think small and focus on the meaning of “thin slices” of behavior.

The key is to rely on our “adaptive unconscious”–a 24/7 mental valet–that provides us with instant and sophisticated information to warn of danger, read a stranger, or react to a new idea. Gladwell includes caveats about leaping to conclusions: marketers can manipulate our first impressions, high arousal moments make us “mind blind,” focusing on the wrong cue leaves us vulnerable to “the Warren Harding Effect” (i.e., voting for a handsome but hapless president).

Our Iceberg is Melting…

A book I am reading. Here is the summary:

“Even when it is obvious to you that change in your organization is necessary, the difficulties that loom for creating that change can be intimidating. Or perhaps the change effort is well underway in your organization, but faltering. John Kotter, Harvard Business School’s leadership and change guru, sits down with BetterManagement to talk about what he has learned about changing organizations, why some change management efforts succeed, and why others fail. This interview provides guideposts for measuring your own change effort, using Kotter’s eight-step process for successful change.

These are:
1. Create a sense of urgency
2. Pull together the guiding team
3. Develop the vision and change strategy
4. Communicate for understanding and buy-in
5. Empower others to act
6. Produce short-term wins
7. Don’t let up
8. Create a new culture

The lessons you can draw from this interview will serve you well on the job, in your family and in your community. Based on John Kotter’s pioneering work on how to make smart change happen faster and better, the interview provides invaluable guidance no matter where you are in the organization—executives, managers and aspiring leaders at any level will all benefit. And the lessons are becoming ever more important as the world around us changes faster and faster.”